intersect

Intersect divided

Despite the various ups and downs of the intersect project, we now seem to be back on track. With my sections of the book typed and sent to T – using recorded delivery (to ensure against further losses!); I have been able to move on to the covers, whilst T begins the typing of her sections, whenever she gets some spare time… thanks to the portable typewriter!
We are using the covers from my book but the (new) title has been taken from the title page of T’s book. The initial idea for the front cover was to translate the title using code, however the symbols +*=:/ are not all available as wood type, therefore it was decided to overprint the full title using black ink to reflect the typed code of the inner pages. The inscription from T’s original book was also letterpress printed, this time using red to reflect the second colour of the typing, it was placed in the same position as the original book – the inside front cover; these processes continue the concept of intersect.

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Intersect intersected

After 8 days of waiting for the parcel from T to arrive, it became apparent that part of the original book pages were lost somewhere in the postal system. My initial thoughts were that this would put an end to the project, however a Facetime discussion enabled us to establish that T had made some copies and only 6 pages in total had been lost, this meant that we could still proceed. We decided that rather than reduce the number of pages, the book would remain at 20pp with the lost text pages remaining either blank – or with something to identify or even celebrate the loss. Although the delay had an impact on the original planned production schedule – once typing commenced on the newly adjusted pages, it was an incredibly quick process, and as time went by it became easy to translate each sentence quite naturally into the code – almost becoming fluent in a new hieroglyphic language!

Intersect logistics!

 

trace2

Having finalized all the details for Intersect, as we began to start work, it became apparent that whilst we had divided and swapped sections of the two original books, further work was needed to resolve the imposition and order of the new book before work could begin.

Talking face to face, we quickly identified that we didn’t have enough text pages for Revised Edition to be more than 20pp, and we would need to re-distribute the pages that had already been divided. We made the decision to type the book (using the code), in the same order as the original edition. Through discussion some former decisions were also adjusted – namely the covers and end papers.

At the end of the discussion we agreed tasks – I offered to work out the imposition and make a dummy, whilst T would re-divide the text pages and post the necessary extra pages to me.

Revised Edition

The opportunity to share first sample pages face to face enabled scrutiny of the given theme, analysis of our decision making process to date, and the format of the book to be finally confirmed. Ideas were exchanged and initial concerns around the scale of the typewritten key in contrast to the cross stitch transfer page alphabets were talked through and solutions were found collaboratively.

We have decided to revise both independently found cross-stitch books by transcribing the text from one book onto the pattern transfers from the second book using a typewritten key-based system. The key will be printed onto both sides of the transfer paper utilising the grid format in the original book which will result in off set printing when the pages are viewed together. The scale of the transfer pages will enable us to construct two new double page spreads from each sheet which we plan to insert into the first book. In this way imagery and text, original substrates and outer book covers will all intersect.

Sections of first sample pages provided further ideas about other outcomes which may possibly enlarge sections of given and intersected pattern.

+*=:/

Following our Facetime discussion two weeks ago, we have both divided and sent our
respective half books to each other, giving us an opportunity to examine and reflect on
potential directions for Intersect. Having identified that both books used colour keys, tonight’s discussion centered around the idea of applying a similar process to that of the Windham
Papers
, through the development of a key-based system.

The challenge with the cross-stitch books is that they are both largely image based, so we came to the conclusion that by using the text matter, which is more limited, we could allocate a typewriter symbol to the five vowels. We did this by a process of discussion and elimination resulting in the following key: a + e* i= o: u/

The key will enable us to interpret the text through the development of a series of patterns typed on top of the existing book. Due to the sometimes dense nature of the pages, each pattern will be typed in red in response to whatever space is available; to enable a greater sense of hierarchy, headings will be letterpress printed in a different colour using the same key. We’ll each attempt a sample page before we meet in a week’s time. A decision regarding the schedule and book structure will made once we are satisfied that the idea is feasible.

Idea Exchange

A pre-arranged FaceTime conversation enabled the exchange of first ideas gathered independently in response to our new projects.  We are keen to continue with the methods of making established in our last project which are rooted in Serial Art and talked around a range of possible starting points.

Inspired by the purchase of 2 cross stitch books, first research into this craft has revealed rules and conventions around restrictions with image placement which could be interesting to make use.  A potential colour palette is listed within one of the books with particular symbols linking to specific colours.  The symbols have some reference to the patterns we created using the typewriter in our previous project and the making of these links with the theme of Intersect.  The process of making a cross stitch also links Intersect and also offers further potential to divide pages into two parts,  cut across, overlap and criss cross.  Whilst these are interesting ideas, first examination of the two books presented challenges in how to connect them.  Eventually we have decided upon sending half of each book to each other for further examination.  This will involve taking the books apart and some independent decision making which may provide new ideas

We considered the idea of using text messages to instruct each other in the production of art work and both liked this idea initially although were unsure of how this would lead to an outcome.   P shared ideas making use of found books and experiences from the recent Artist Book Fair in Bristol (BABE) around working on editions and one-off books from the same starting point.  We discussed first ideas for the Windham papers and P will initiate this process by texting the first rule that we will undertake on our individual volumes of the book.

With many potential ideas to consider we have fixed a second Facetime conversation and a meeting within the next 3 weeks in order to move both projects forward.  Prior to these we have agreed to send each other half of our cross stitch books and share links to first reading.

Removing the papers from my cross stitch book to send to P has revealed 9 sections with each section having 3 double pages.  The remaining pages are glued onto the binding – perhaps these remaining pages can be the starting point for the the new book?

References:

https://www.thecrossstitchguild.com/cross-stitch-basics/cross-stitch-basics.aspx

https://broadmuseum.msu.edu/exhibitions/pattern-follow-rules

Moving on

So it’s time to start thinking about our next projects. The altered book exhibition that relates to the Windham Papers is currently on hold, so there has been no sense of urgency to start this project; with that said, there has been a brief email exchange with a proposal to get the ball rolling. Following on from thoughts blogged several months ago, and an awareness that neither T or I particularly like the altered book genre, we recognise that to make the project worthwhile, we need to find a suitable approach that both challenges our current working practice but enables us to enjoy the process and play to our strengths.

In review of the working methods adopted throughout our last project we note that working to rules and given conventions provides a further focus to our making.  Previous blog posts acknowledge that given restrictions within scales of working, image placement and colour choice provokes discussion, stimulates ideas and extends our practice.  A systematic approach to making artwork is developing which we are interested in continuing.  Recent research into the concept of Serial Art, artwork produced by Sol LeWitt and Tam Van Tran has further consolidated these ideas.  With this in mind, the current proposition is to collaboratively devise a set number of rules that will then be applied to our individual books using whatever method we decide – this part of the project will be undertaken independently.

Alongside this we will develop another project on the theme of intersect – a call for entries from we love your books – this project is likely to be based on two chance purchases that we made independently, but on the same day.  Both books contain guidelines and patterns to produce cross stitch and one is inscribed:

Antonia, Hours of Happy Needlework           Caroline        22.06.76
It is hoped that both these projects will offer different challenges in terms of our collaborative practice and enable us to develop new working methodologies.

References:

https://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/themes/conceptual-art/sol-lewitt-and-instruction-based-art

http://www.theartstory.org/artist-lewitt-sol.htm

http://www.tate.org.uk/art/art-terms/s/serial-art

https://broadmuseum.msu.edu/exhibitions/pattern-follow-rules

https://www.artsy.net/artist/tam-van-tran